UConn Professor Wins Award For Scholarship and Mentoring

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Dr. Markus, a professor of psychology and behavioral neuroscience, conducts research with graduate and undergraduate students at the UConn Storrs campus. Markus won the Mary S. Eskine Award for Scholarship and Mentoring at the Northeast Undergraduate Research Organization for Neuroscience, or NEURON.  Photo courtesy of Markus Lab at the University of Connecticut    website   .

Dr. Markus, a professor of psychology and behavioral neuroscience, conducts research with graduate and undergraduate students at the UConn Storrs campus. Markus won the Mary S. Eskine Award for Scholarship and Mentoring at the Northeast Undergraduate Research Organization for Neuroscience, or NEURON. Photo courtesy of Markus Lab at the University of Connecticut website.

On Feb. 25, University of Connecticut professor Etan Markus won the Mary S. Eskine Award for Scholarship and Mentoring at the Northeast Undergraduate Research Organization for Neuroscience, or NEURON, according to the Quinnipiac Chronicle

Dr. Markus, a professor of psychology and behavioral neuroscience, conducts research with graduate and undergraduate students at the UConn Storrs campus.  

The event took place in North Haven and welcomed neuroscience students and professors from over 30 universities in New England. Students at the event presented research on topics like the effects of stress, Alzheimer’s Disease and other neurological diseases in a poster session, according to the article.   


Dr. Markus’ research focuses on the development of memories using rats. His team monitors the rat’s brain cells, or neurons, while at rest and while performing tasks such as running a maze.  Photo courtesy of Markus Lab at the University of Connecticut    website   .

Dr. Markus’ research focuses on the development of memories using rats. His team monitors the rat’s brain cells, or neurons, while at rest and while performing tasks such as running a maze. Photo courtesy of Markus Lab at the University of Connecticut website.

The Mary S. Eskine Award was created in honor of a former professor at Boston University who died from breast cancer in 2007 for her work in neuroscience and position as the Director of Undergraduate Research at Boston University. The award is given to professors nominated by their students for advocating undergraduate research and mentoring.  

“I have two PhD students and 13 undergraduate students in my lab and, unknown to me, they and former students nominated me for this award,” Dr. Markus said. 

Dr. Markus’ research focuses on the development of memories using rats. His team monitors the rat’s brain cells, or neurons, while at rest and while performing tasks such as running a maze. This data comes from the hippocampus, a region of the brain that is important for memory and spatial awareness. 

Thomas Shao, an eighth-semester physiology and neurobiology major who does research with Dr. Markus, summarizes the research as the following, “How do our experiences turn into a memory, what are the [neuronal] processes that go into observational learning and how do the different parts of the brain interact in order for us to perform spatial and motor responses?” 

Thumbnail photo courtesy of Markus Lab at the University of Connecticut website.


Samuel Katz is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached at samuel.katz@uconn.edu

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