In Case You Missed It: What (good) happened this week beyond UConn

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For the next few weeks, “In Case You Missed It” will solely be focusing on good things that have happened outside of UConn in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Because of the influx of news from the mainstream media, I decided it was best to reframe this column in a way that allows it to be a positive place for people to go to and remember when they need a pick-me-up. As always, stay healthy and stay safe. 


Dr. Rhonda Klein of Westport donated her plasma to the Red Cross so they can use her antibodies to help others following recovery from COVID-19.  Image courtesy of    md.com

Dr. Rhonda Klein of Westport donated her plasma to the Red Cross so they can use her antibodies to help others following recovery from COVID-19. Image courtesy of md.com

Donating Plasma

A Fairfield woman who was one of the first people to be diagnosed with COVID-19 in Connecticut is now donating her plasma to the Red Cross so they can use her antibodies to help others, according to WTNH. Dr. Rhonda Klein of Westport and her whole family tested positive for the virus several weeks ago but have since recovered and are doing well. “So we can give this convalescent plasma to people who are sick and who don’t have the ability to make their own antibodies, or aren’t making enough,” said Dr. F. Bernadette West, who serves as Northeast Regional Medical Director of the American Red Cross. Others who have recovered from COVID-19 and are interested in donating their plasma are encouraged to go to http://www.redcrossblood.org. 


Many cages in animal shelters sit empty as pet adoptions jumped in the state.  Photo by    Eric Ward    on    Unsplash

Many cages in animal shelters sit empty as pet adoptions jumped in the state. Photo by Eric Ward on Unsplash

Pet Adoptions

Pet adoptions are on the rise in Connecticut and around the country amid the COVID-19 quarantine, according to WFSB. At the Dan Cosgrove Animal Shelter in Branford, all 16 cages were empty for the first time in the shelter’s 17 years of operation. “For people who are thinking about adopting an animal, this is the perfect time to be in that mindset,” Laura Burban, the director of the shelter, said. “The week or so before everything went kind of crazy, we already had 50 to 75 applicants that were approved, so we started getting through those applicants at rapid rates and were able to streamline the process and get dogs into home,” she added. 


Actor-writer-director John Krasinski poses at the premiere of the film "Mary Poppins Returns" at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Krasinski and retired Boston Red Sox standout David Ortiz announced Sunday, April 12, 2020, during Krasinski's "Some Good News" YouTube show that workers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston would be getting free Red Sox tickets.  Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File

Actor-writer-director John Krasinski poses at the premiere of the film “Mary Poppins Returns” at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Krasinski and retired Boston Red Sox standout David Ortiz announced Sunday, April 12, 2020, during Krasinski’s “Some Good News” YouTube show that workers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston would be getting free Red Sox tickets. Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File

Hamilton Surprise

The cast of the critically-acclaimed musical “Hamilton” gathered with actor John Krasinski on his YouTube show “Some Good News” to surprise a fan who was upset she would not be able to see the show due to the COVID-19 quarantine, according to NPR. 9-year-old Aubrey’s mother had taken to Twitter earlier this month to express her sadness about the show’s cancellation. Krasinski invited Aubrey on the show and informed her he would fly her out to see “Hamilton” once Broadway reopened. Several of the “Hamilton” cast members then joined the Zoom call to give the star-struck Aubrey her own performance of the hit “Alexander Hamilton” featuring Lin-Manuel Miranda. 


A Captain in the military during World War II, Tom Moore has surpassed over £8,500,000 in raising money for the National Health Service (NHS).  Image courtesy of    Tom Moore Fundraising Page

A Captain in the military during World War II, Tom Moore has surpassed over £8,500,000 in raising money for the National Health Service (NHS). Image courtesy of Tom Moore Fundraising Page

Walking to Raise Money

A 99-year-old British veteran recently pledged to walk 10 laps a day in order to raise money for the National Health Service (NHS), according to MSN. Tom Moore was a Captain in the military in World War II and plans to walk the length of his backyard 100 times before he turns 100 next month. His drive’s goal of £500,000 was surpassed at over £8,500,000 as of Wednesday afternoon with over 400,000 donors supporting the cause. His fundraising page can be found here.


Many countries have been seeing drastic reductions in air pollution as the pandemic has increased the quality of environmental conditions around the world.  Photo by    Arnaud Mesureur    on    Unsplash

Many countries have been seeing drastic reductions in air pollution as the pandemic has increased the quality of environmental conditions around the world. Photo by Arnaud Mesureur on Unsplash

Environmental Improvements

The COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to the improvement of environmental conditions all around the globe, according to CNET. China’s lockdown, for example, led to a 25% carbon dioxide emission decrease compared to the same period of time last year. A researcher at Stanford University calculated that the emissions reduction from the months of January and February could save over 70,000 lives. Satellite has also shown a drastic reduction in air pollution in countries where lockdowns and travel bans have been instituted. 

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In Case You Missed It: What happened this week beyond UConn

In Case You Missed It: What happened this week beyond UConn


Taylor Harton is the associate news editor for The Daily Campus. She can be reached by email at taylor.harton@uconn.edu.

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