Pride celebrations moved to online

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New York City Pride has been cancelled due to new social distancing rules as a result of COVID-19. That won’t stop the festivities, though, as they have instead moved online to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots.  Photo via commons.wikimedia.org.

New York City Pride has been cancelled due to new social distancing rules as a result of COVID-19. That won’t stop the festivities, though, as they have instead moved online to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. Photo via commons.wikimedia.org.

“NYC Pride” is one of the largest Pride celebrations in the world, with WorldPride 2019 in the city commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots attracting over 2.5 million participants. However, due to the health concerns and current social distancing guidelines, the New York City-based parade that usually happens in June, among other in-person events celebrating LGBTQ+ rights and acceptance, have been put on hold. 

Despite the physical restrictions, organizers and participants alike haven’t let that be a reason not to celebrate the progress in the LGBTQ+ rights movement and to showcase their pride. Organizations are planning online Pride events for people across the globe to take part.

“New York City is the birthplace of the modern LGBTQ rights movement,” Bill de Blasio, mayor of NYC, said in a press release announcing the cancellation of in-person Pride events for the city. The press release was made in tandem with Heritage of Pride, the nonprofit organization that plans the city’s official Pride events every year. “While this pandemic prevents us from coming together to march, it will in no way stop us from celebrating the indelible contributions that the LGBTIA+ community has made to New York City or from recommitting ourselves to the fight for equal rights.”

InterPride, an international organization of LGBTQ+ rights groups across the globe, is planning a 24-hour Global Pride event to be hosted online on June 27. The event is being co-hosted by the European Pride Organizers Association (EPOA).

“We need community and connection more than ever,” J. Andrew Baker, co-president of InterPride, said on the organization’s announcement. “This gives us an opportunity to both connect and celebrate the LGBTQIA+ community’s resilience in the face of this pandemic and the true spirit of Pride.”


In times of isolation and fear it is now more important than people come together to celebrate this important occasion. Now instead of hosting pride parades in each state, the goal is to have a global pride to celebrate nationwide.  Photo via commons.wikimedia.org.

In times of isolation and fear it is now more important than people come together to celebrate this important occasion. Now instead of hosting pride parades in each state, the goal is to have a global pride to celebrate nationwide. Photo via commons.wikimedia.org.

The transition of Pride events online is important for members of the movement to maintain morale and express solidarity for the community, especially in this time.

“As a leader in the Pride movement, we felt it was really important to take the lead and come together…to organize a platform which empowers and really would encourage people to see the light at the end of the tunnel, despite everything happening now in the world,” Julian Sanjivan, another InterPride co-president, said. “It’s going to inspire folks, going to give them courage, going to be able to bring about positivity, and that’s really important.”

Event planners hope global organizations continue to host local Pride events leading up to Global Pride. The event is bound to look different from the physical parade; however, they hope for it to have the same spirit. 

“Events will be about bringing together Pride organizations and the broader LGBTQIA community around the globe,” Andrew Baker, InterPride co-president, said. “Pride organizations have been invited to express interest in producing or providing content to the event, and it will be a mixture of both live speeches, dialogue, engagement pieces, performances by musicians, queer artists, and other entertainers.”

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Hollie Lao is a staff writer and the social media manager for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at hollianne.lao@uconn.edu.

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