Post-grad bucket list

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Here are a few ideas to put on your post-grad bucket list.  Photo by    Glenn Carstens-Peters    on    Unsplash

Here are a few ideas to put on your post-grad bucket list. Photo by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash

College life is jam-packed and stressful. Between coursework, part-time jobs and clubs, there’s never really any time to do the things you have always wanted to do. So, if you’re not exactly sure what to do with yourself between virtual commencement and whatever your next step in life is, here’s a few ideas:

Write a book!


If book-writing has been a dream of yours, now might be the perfect time to give it a go.  Photo by    Aaron Burden    on    Unsplash

If book-writing has been a dream of yours, now might be the perfect time to give it a go. Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

According to New York Times writer Joseph Epstein, 81% of Americans want to write a book, but the majority of them never try. Books are daunting, time-consuming tasks. But if book-writing has been a dream of yours, now might be the perfect time to give it a go. Just remember, it doesn’t have to be a good book. It doesn’t have to be poignant or classic like “The Catcher in the Rye” or “Moby Dick.” But when it’s all written out neatly on your Google Drive or Word Doc, you’ll know that it’s all yours. Just try writing a page or two at a time, and before you know it, you’ll have a book on your hands.

Train for a marathon!


Start training for a marathon.  Photo by    Mārtiņš Zemlickis    on    Unsplash

Start training for a marathon. Photo by Mārtiņš Zemlickis on Unsplash

Marathons are a tradition going back to Ancient Greece, and while they are hard, grueling tasks to undergo, they aren’t as impossible as you might think. Experts at REI recommend starting a year ahead of your race, building up your mileage slowly and signing up for a few shorter races first. There are plenty of resources online that will help you train for your big day, and give you advice for every step along the way. Now is the time to see what your body is capable of!

Learn how to play an instrument!


Take some time to learn a new instrument. The ukulele or the harmonica are easy beginner instruments that don’t cost very much.  Photo by    Avi Naim    on    Unsplash

Take some time to learn a new instrument. The ukulele or the harmonica are easy beginner instruments that don’t cost very much. Photo by Avi Naim on Unsplash

Although public schools require students to take up an instrument at some point or another in elementary or middle school, most people don’t continue practicing into adulthood. Maybe now is your chance to get music back into your life! Instruments like the ukulele or the harmonica don’t cost very much, at around $50 and $15 respectively, and are incredibly easy to learn how to play. There are free tutorials for both all over YouTube that will help you learn any of your favorite songs in no time.

Learn a new language!


Learn a new language using apps like Duolingo.  Photo by    Soner Eker    on    Unsplash

Learn a new language using apps like Duolingo. Photo by Soner Eker on Unsplash

With apps like Duolingo, learning a language has never been easier. Although Chinese is considered the most widespread and important language to learn right now, it’s not necessarily the easiest. Experts say the easiest languages for English speakers to learn are Norwegian, Swedish, Spanish, Dutch, Portuguese, Indonesian, Italian, French and Swahili, in that order. Considering how desirable speakers of multiple languages are on the job market, it might be the very key to your future.

Stop lying on your resume!

Your resume might be beefed up with every lie from a proficiency in Excel to beginner Italian, but with all the sudden time you have on your hands, maybe you don’t have to lie anymore. Take the time over the next few months to learn the complex programs and code languages your future job might desire. Spend a few weeks obsessing over Duolingo. Invest a few dollars in a harmonica. All this free time you have is the perfect opportunity for a little self-improvement. Explore just how much you can learn, how far you can run or how many pages you can write before the next stage of your life starts.


Rebecca Maher is the associate life editor for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at rebecca.l.maher@uconn.edu.

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