New weather cancelation policy includes in-person and online classes

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The statue of Jonathan the Husky outside of Gampel Pavillion on Monday morning. In the event of compromising weather conditions, the university has made the decision to cancel both in-person and online classes to acknowledge the potential technical difficulties that may present. Photo by Will Cronkhite/The Daily Campus

When the University of Connecticut issues a delay, early dismissal or cancelation due to weather, both in-person and synchronous online classes will be cancelled, Stephanie Reitz, university spokesperson, said.  

Reitz said UConn officials recognize that compromising weather conditions may cause technological difficulties, leading to trouble accessing remote classes.  

“That approach recognizes that some students and faculty might have electrical outages or internet issues that would make it difficult for them to be online for classes, particularly if weather conditions are challenging enough to cancel in-person classes,” Reitz said.  

This policy is expected to continue with all weather-related decisions going forward, Reitz said. She said if weather ends up being more severe than initially predicted, UConn may end up announcing a delay, early dismissal and/or cancellation. If the weather is more mild than predicted, they will not change any announcements that have already been made publicly.  

“These decisions are always a balancing act, and cancellations or delays are based on the best weather forecasts and other information we have available to us at the time,” Reitz said.  

“These decisions are always a balancing act, and cancellations or delays are based on the best weather forecasts and other information we have available to us at the time.”

Emma Pereira, a sixth-semester business management major, said she is a fan of the new policy.  

“I really like the policy, especially because the power could [go] out and students with online classes could be screwed over,” Pereira said. “I also think it promotes fairness.”  

Victoria Kostour, sixth-semester psychological sciences and molecular and cell biology double major, said she found the snow day confusing as it was difficult to determine scheduling. As a commuter student this semester, she said she feared missing classes later in the week to make up her lab section. She was pleasantly surprised to have a remote option.  

“I was able to make up the lab with a remote section, which in earlier years would probably never be an option,” Kostour said. “On the other hand, my asynchronous class still posted lectures, so not all classes were canceled. I still had work to do on that day.”    

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