National News: Water shortages, classroom debates and ex-presidential trials

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“it’s been building up for years, but we have had an unprecedented amount of rain in the last two to three weeks, and it just kind of created this havoc, what we are dealing with right now.”

Ronnie Crudup

Recently, a water emergency in Jackson, Mississippi, debates surrounding a Texas bill mandating “In God We Trust” signs in classrooms and the continued investigation by the Department of Justice into former President Trump have been at the forefront of national news. 

A culmination of recent flooding over the course of the summer and infrastructural failings have left residents of Mississippi’s capital without drinkable water, according to CNN. An unanticipated amount of rain in recent weeks has put too great a strain on the water treatment and supplying facilities of the city. 

“’It’s been building up for years, but we have had an unprecedented amount of rain in the last two to three weeks, and it just kind of created this havoc, what we are dealing with right now,’ [state representative Ronnie Crudup] said,” CNN reported. 

Jackson Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba told CNN this failure did not come as a surprise. In particular, he cited long-standing issues with the city’s water systems that previously went unaddressed.  

“But Lumumba said during a Monday news conference that it was only a matter [of] time before the water system failed because Jackson’s water system has… faced serious issues for years,” according to CNN. 

As of Aug. 31, there is no projected date for the conclusion of this crisis. 

Senate Bill 797, a recent Texas law requiring that public schools in the state display signage reading “In God We Trust” in classrooms without school funding, has been fought by activists at the local level. According to NPR, Srivan Krishna and other Southlake, Texas, residents brought forward posters that have since made headlines. 

Krishna presented two posters to the school board: one on a rainbow background and one in Arabic, according to NPR. The posters presented by Krishna and his fellow protestors were not accepted by the board without debate, which another presenter expressed her disapproval for. 

“[The dOJ correction of Trump’s narrative] presents a strong rebuttal of the criticisms of the fbi’s unprecedented search of a former president’s residence, laying out clearly how trump had failed to return dozens of classified documents even after his lawyer attested that he had provided all classified material in his possession.”

CNN

“Another speaker, Jennifer Schutter, later said the posters had been designed by current and former students in Southlake, adding that she was ‘very disappointed’ the board didn’t accept the signs,” according to NPR. 

The Justice Department has now found over 320 classified documents in former President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago home, including over 100 acquired from the FBI at the beginning of the month, according to CNN. According to the Justice Department, Trump has presented an inaccurate narrative surrounding recent events. 

“Trump has pushed an ‘incomplete and inaccurate narrative’ in his recent court filings about the Mar-a-Lago search, the Justice Department said,” according to CNN. 

In particular, the Justice Department looked to defend its search of Trump’s residence, according to CNN. CNN said Trump failed to return several classified documents, despite the fact that his lawyers claimed he had returned everything in his possession. 

“[The DOJ correction of Trump’s narrative] presents a strong rebuttal of the criticisms of the FBI’s unprecedented search of a former President’s residence, laying out clearly how Trump had failed to return dozens of classified documents even after his lawyer attested that he had provided all classified material in his possession,” according to CNN. 

In response to these events, Trump has claimed his constitutional rights have been violated, according to CNN. Particularly, Trump said some of the documents seized contained information protected by executive privilege. 

“Trump has argued that his constitutional rights have been violated and that some of the documents seized earlier this month contain material covered by…executive privilege,” according to CNN. 

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