‘Transatlantic’ confused me 

1
112
Have you watched a show or heard a song that sounds or looks good, but something about it is simply off? If not, you will experience this feeling while watching Netflix’s new show, which is based on real people and events, “Transatlantic.”  Photo from Netflix.

Have you watched a show or heard a song that sounds or looks good, but something about it is simply off? If not, you will experience this feeling while watching Netflix’s new show, which is based on real people and events, “Transatlantic.”  

The amount of content covering the Second World War increases every day. Whether it be a compilation of first-hand accounts, reenactments of major turning points or a documentary-style history lesson, it seems as if the media has covered every aspect of World War II. However, this new series brings out a side of the war that I personally have not seen or heard much of prior to watching.  

While I found the plot of the show entertaining — as far as learning from it — I often found myself rewinding to try to understand what was even going on. I found the side stories easier to follow than the main storyline.  

“Transatlantic” follows the lives of the core members of the American Emergency Rescue Committee: Varian Fry, Mary Jayne Gold, Thomas Lovegrove and informal members Albert Hirschman and Lisa Fittko. The committee’s primary purpose is to help European refugees vulnerable to imprisonment escape and get to America via secret paths and false identifications. 

The committee finds itself gaining very little success at a painfully slow rate, with only a total of 11 out of 200 prospective refugees saved. One of these 11, Lisa Fittko proved herself an asset to the committee and their goals with Albert Hirschman as her advocate. With her geographical intelligence and Albert’s impressive acting skills, nearly 100 refugees could escape war-tainted Europe by crossing the Spanish border by a secret path behind the mountains.  

Every day the committee faces a new obstacle that puts themselves and their refugees at risk. Threats range from the French and Spanish governments choosing to close their borders, raids at the main hotel the committee uses to house their refugees, double-crossers and frozen funds among much more.  

It sounds like I managed to grasp a decent understanding of these events, but in reality, the understanding is very surface-level. I could not easily identify how these events connected or the plans the committee aspired to accomplish. Additionally, the plot was flooded with distractions that I doubt are historically accurate.  

For one, certain members of the committee decide to host a party for the refugees to, from what I understood, alleviate the tension. The motive behind such a decision still doesn’t make sense to me. Second, there is an utterly random musical scene performed by a character I never quite learned the name of. And third, there are way too many love triangles. While all of these situations make the show lighthearted – which some may appreciate seeing in a World War II film – they distract from the educational aspect that I believe is necessary.  

While I did not fully enjoy or understand the plot, that does not mean no one else will. If you are fond of history or are interested in learning about yet another face of the largest war in history, then you may appreciate “Transatlantic.” 

Review: 3/5 

1 COMMENT

  1. A good option is that I will just need to write several book reviews and essays based on one novel. Now there are simpler options like https://google.com/ services that can help, but as for me, it’s better to read it yourself and draw your own conclusions

Leave a Reply