Editorial: Can the books be burned now? 

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According to the Office of Student and Financial Aid Services at the University of Connecticut, the estimated annual cost of books and supplies for UConn students approaches $950. (File/The Daily Campus)

According to the Office of Student and Financial Aid Services at the University of Connecticut, the estimated annual cost of books and supplies for UConn students approaches $950. (File/The Daily Campus)

In the United States, college students are frequently wrought with an onslaught of responsibilities, deadlines and expenses. Students at the University of Connecticut are no different. A fundamental expense endemic to the college education is that of purchasing textbooks and, fortunately, there are effective means of reducing it.

Students will be plagued by the cost of purchasing textbooks in the present and quite likely haunted by such a burden well into their future upon graduation. According to the Office of Student and Financial Aid Services at the University of Connecticut, the estimated annual cost of books and supplies for UConn students approaches $950. Assuming a student attends the university for four years, they will spend approximately $3,800 on textbooks alone.

In the event that UConn students, and collegiate scholars nationwide, are interested in reducing the costs of purchasing textbooks for classes, there are ways to do so. According to Penina Beede of The Daily Campus, students have the option to purchase used textbooks which “allows students to have unlimited access to the course material and keep the copy at the end of the term.” Although, she notes, “While affordable, the price is only slightly cheaper than the market value of a new textbook.” Therefore, she suggests renting textbooks because doing so “can be a much more affordable alternative to buying a textbook that will go unused when the semester ends.” Finally, she notes that students can opt for e-textbooks, elaborating, “The online edition of a textbook can be accessed through rental or purchase from the publisher or from book-selling sites.” While purchasing used textbooks or renting are certainly viable options that will be quite effective in saving students valuable money, the transition of reading material from page to screen appears to be the most frugal.

Kayla Webb of Time Magazine explains, “Students may be able to save as much as 80% off textbook prices.

Many students, in the technological age, opt to take down class notes with a tablet or laptop instead of pen and notebook. It is likely that students will already be in possession of a device, including a cell phone, on which to download the textbooks. Not only will students potentially avoid some heavy lifting, but they’ll also have the opportunity to slice into that $3,800 debt weighing them down more than their backpacks.


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