How to Stop Being Single and Get Ready to Mingle: Romantic gestures

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As cliche as it sounds, a romantic gesture can be as basic as giving your partner a bouquet of flowers or a surprise treat of their favorite candy. Yes, it’s done in all the movies, but when the desk in their dorm is brightened with a pretty bundle of roses or daisies for a week, it will make them think of you and smile every time they step into their room. ( Arup Malakar/Flickr Creative Commons )

As cliche as it sounds, a romantic gesture can be as basic as giving your partner a bouquet of flowers or a surprise treat of their favorite candy. Yes, it’s done in all the movies, but when the desk in their dorm is brightened with a pretty bundle of roses or daisies for a week, it will make them think of you and smile every time they step into their room. (Arup Malakar/Flickr Creative Commons)

So you’re dating someone or crushing hard and you want to show them how you feel. How do you do that in a way that will sweep them off their feet or make them blush? How do you step up your basic flirting and/or make-out sessions in your room to something that will keep them smiling for the rest of the day? Maybe it’s time to try romantic gestures.

As cliche as it sounds, a romantic gesture can be as basic as giving your partner a bouquet of flowers or a surprise treat of their favorite candy. Yes, it’s done in all the movies, but when the desk in their dorm is brightened with a pretty bundle of roses or daisies for a week, it will make them think of you and smile every time they step into their room.

Take a few moves from movies and TV shows. Write them notes like Peter did for Lara Jean in “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before.” They can be short ones like “Have an amazing day!” or long ones listing all the reasons you love them. Plus, you can leave them in places like their desk or in their backpack where they’ll find later, so they’ll be reminded of how much you like them even when you’re not there. You can go even cheesier than that by serenading them like Jake in “Freaky Friday” or by playing their favorite song like in “Say Anything.”

But the key part of romantic gestures isn’t spending money or wooing them in ways that are completely out of the ordinary. The most important gestures are the little things. Telling them you love them when you hang up the phone, saying goodnight and good morning everyday, holding their hand when you walk places with them and kissing them hello and goodbye all show them you care. The very last thing you want to do while you’re in a relationship, or even when you’re trying to date someone in the first place, is make them feel like you’re not interested. Really, the best gesture is your full attention. That means no phones, eyes on them, no distractions or other people. So give them dorky pet names, text them all day long, kiss their nose, hug them for way longer than you’d hug a friend and tell them every little thing you like about them. It can only make them fall for you more.

Psychology Today claims successful couples have at least 20 positive interactions a day to every negative one. They say in the animal kingdom, almost every type of animal has a ritual they perform with their partner whenever they see them. Siamangs sing, French angelfish twirl around each other and prairie voles groom their partners, but what does that have to do with humans? The only time all of these animals stop these rituals is when they’re terminating the relationship. The same can be said for people. If one partner isn’t demonstrating that they’re invested, then the other partner will grow more upset and resentful and eventually end it completely. They say the gestures don’t have to be immense, but they should be frequent. In effect, everyday should be treated like it’s Valentine’s Day.

If you have any questions or need any dating advice, feel free to contact me at rebecca.l.maher@uconn.edu. I’m positive other people are facing the same romantic problems as you, and would love to hear an answer.


Rebecca Maher is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at rebecca.l.maher@uconn.edu.

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