The rise of vaping on school campuses becomes more alarming than ever 

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ASACC hosts a small gathering at Student Union providing samosas and chai tea. During the meeting students also talked about the danger of vaping.  Photo by Eric Yang / The Daily Campus.

ASACC hosts a small gathering at Student Union providing samosas and chai tea. During the meeting students also talked about the danger of vaping. Photo by Eric Yang / The Daily Campus.

Vaporizers, also known as vapes or e-cigarettes, are becoming more prevalent on college campuses. Vapes and e-cigarettes have a greater appeal than traditional cigarettes because of their various tastes and smells. The brothers of Delta Epsilon Psi and sisters of Delta Phi Lambda held the “Chai Time: Rise of Vaping” presentation in the Asian American Cultural Center to educate students about the impact that vaping has on our youth today.  

Vaping is becoming prevalent in today’s school environment as more students are seen vaping on high school and middle school campuses. The presentation began by introducing the origins of vaporizers. According to DEPsi’s presentation, e-cigarettes were introduced in 2015 and became popular in 2016. Pods, a type of mini vape, have gained popularity among high school and middle school students with more than 3.6 million students using e-cigarettes today.  

According to the presentation, 40 percent of young adults use e-cigarettes daily, and 47 percent were introduced to them by friends. Many believe vaping is harmless because of the lack of research on the long-term effects. However, more research has come out about the risk of lung diseases among youths who are addicted to these devices. 

Not only is the vaping epidemic becoming a highly talked about issue in school campuses, but the marketing of these devices is just as problematic. E-cigarettes are costly and many people who are addicted will search anywhere to get there hands on them, even if it takes looking into the black market.  

“Chai Time” is an interactive discussion hosted by the brothers of Delta Epsilon Psi every two to three weeks. Their meetings are catered for students to discuss relevant issues in today’s news.  


ASACC hosts a small gathering at Student Union providing samosas and chai tea. During the meeting students also talked about the danger of vaping.  Photo by Eric Yang / The Daily Campus.

ASACC hosts a small gathering at Student Union providing samosas and chai tea. During the meeting students also talked about the danger of vaping. Photo by Eric Yang / The Daily Campus.

“It’s really important in our generation [to speak on this topic] because recently people have been diagnosed with lung diseases,” Josie McCormick, seventh-semester allied health sciences major and member of DPhiL, said. Universities around the country are becoming aware of the issue of vaping addiction and began to raise awareness of its dangerous effects.  

“It seems like vapes are becoming more and more prevalent in our current generation,” Tino Marrero, a seventh-semester major and member of DEPsi, said. “It seems to be the trend, a negative one at that. If we don’t monitor the issue today, the future could suffer the consequences.”  

The floor was open to discussion about what can society do to mitigate the usage of vapes and if it would be beneficial to bring up this issue in school curriculums. Before the presentation began, Mirrano asked how many students in the room vape or had vaped. Few raised their hands and many hesitated to answer, showing how many people feel vulnerable sharing their experience with vaping.  

A few students spoke about their addiction and how many addicts will find alternatives to get their kick of nicotine. Students compared e-cigarettes to cigarettes and alcohol, stating the negative similarities between all three substances. But many people still continue to use them. Some argued that it’s up to individual choice whether or not to use these substances.  

The main issue discussed during the presentation was the lack of research regarding e-cigarettes. There is not much data on the long-term effects vaping has on the body. After seeing more news outlets reveal health problems that can be related to using e-cigarettes, many students at the discussion shared their experiences and their plans to stop their usage of e-cigarettes.  


Cindy Lam is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached at cindy.lam@uconn.edu.

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