UConn students divided over Trump impeachment

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Nancy Pelosi testified before congressional lawmakers to discuss an impeachment plan for President Trump. A recent phone call between President Trump and Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky was leaked revealing solicited information.  AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Nancy Pelosi testified before congressional lawmakers to discuss an impeachment plan for President Trump. A recent phone call between President Trump and Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky was leaked revealing solicited information. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Following Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi’s decision to open an impeachment inquiry into President Trump, the country — as well as the University of Connecticut student body — is starkly divided over the prospect of removing the president from office. 

The saga began with the revelation of a transcript of a phone call between President Trump and Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky, leaked by an unknown whistleblower within the CIA. The transcript revealed that President Trump had solicited information concerning dubious business dealings of Hunter Biden (son of presidential candidate Joe Biden) as a means to damage Biden’s candidacy ahead of the 2020 election.  

Despite Speaker Pelosi’s decision to open an impeachment inquiry into President Trump, professor of political science Dr. Ron Schurin doubts the plausibility of President Trump being removed from office.  

“Right now I’d say there is about a 60% chance of the House voting to impeach and about a 10% chance of the Senate voting to convict,” Dr. Schurin stated. “To convict there needs to be a 2/3 vote [in the Senate]. This means that at least 20 Republican senators have to vote to convict.  Even in the face of overwhelming evidence, I expect that all but a few Republicans will say that the President’s actions don’t warrant conviction.” 

Even still, Shaun Simoneau, fifth-semester political science major and member of the College Democrats, believes House Democrats should move forward with impeachment proceedings eventually — but for different reasons. 

“I’m not sure if impeachment with the Ukraine situation is the right way to go. There isn’t concrete evidence of Trump leveraging foreign aid in the phone call,” Simoneau said. “I would rather see Democrats go after him for his corruption with Saudi Arabia and the $300,000 officials from their government gave him to ‘stay’ at his hotel in D.C.” 

Andrew Bauer, a third-semester engineering major and self-identified Republican, does not think impeachment should be a priority for Congress. 

“I do not support Pelosi’s decision to open an impeachment inquiry into President Trump,” Bauer said. “President Trump asked Ukraine to continue with the investigation into shady dealings that involved American politicians, shady dealings that should be known to the American public.” 


Nick Carbone is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at nicholas.carbone@uconn.edu.

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