Self-Care and Skin: National Healthy Skin Month

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November is National Healthy Skin Month: Here’s how to keep your skin healthy during the harsh winter months.  Photo by    Linh Ha    on    Unsplash   . Thumbnail photo by    Anna Sastre    on    Unsplash   .

November is National Healthy Skin Month: Here’s how to keep your skin healthy during the harsh winter months. Photo by Linh Ha on Unsplash. Thumbnail photo by Anna Sastre on Unsplash.

Here’s your daily reminder to treat and take care of yourself, especially your largest organ. Yes, it’s your skin! Sponsored by the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), November is National Healthy Skin Month, and just in time for the tricky transition between unpredictable fall and harsh winter weather that will no doubt wreak havoc on your skin if you don’t take some precautions. No matter how busy you are or whether you think it is important, you should take the time year-round to take care of yourself and your skin and stay informed on how to do so. This is especially important to remember as we approach exam season once again—a little ways off, but it’s never too early to get started on these healthy habits. 

As your largest and most prominent organ in terms of appearance, your skin can reveal a lot about your overall health. Skin problems have impacted everyone at one point in their lives, from acne to rashes to eczema. This month is meant to help inform us about what keeps our skin healthy, how to treat common skin problems and how to prevent against conditions like skin cancer, which is what inspired the AAD to honor this month. Here are some tips provided by the AAD and National Today to start including in your self-care routines. 

Know your skin type 

Part of the reason why it’s difficult to maintain our skin health is because of how different everyone’s skin is. Whether it be oily, dry or a combination of the two, all types have their own appropriate way of being treated, with the appropriate skin products and maintenance. How you should moisturize and wash your face often depends on your skin type, and sometimes the kind of makeup you wear. 

Hydrate regularly 


Drink at least eight glasses of water a day to stay hydrated and clear toxins out of the skin.  Photo by    Shrey Gupta    on    Unsplash

Drink at least eight glasses of water a day to stay hydrated and clear toxins out of the skin. Photo by Shrey Gupta on Unsplash

Don’t mock the people walking around with Hydroflasks, because at least they’re trying to keep themselves hydrated. Drinking at least eight glasses of water a day keeps your skin moisturized, which is especially necessary with the cold winter weather that usually dries it out. Staying hydrated also helps clear out dangerous toxins in your skin. 

Moisturize daily 

Apply lotion or cream after you shower so your skin is damp and it can lock in moisture. Don’t forget about your face and neck, which deserve a different kind of moisturizer than just body lotion. Hydration will also keep your skin moisturized, so keep these habits in check. 

Keep that face clear 

Make sure to wash your face every day as well as after exercising. Sweat and dirt collect on your face after a long day as well as after sleeping. A mild cleanser and lukewarm water will do the trick. If you’re using some more intense face washes, like with salicylic acid to prevent against acne, try to limit using those more than four times a week. Stop randomly touching your face and keep your hair out of it as well, because these activities will only irritate the delicate skin there. 

Examine your skin 

There are indicators for skin disease like skin cancer that may not seem that out of the ordinary, so make sure to check your skin regularly for signs like new or unusual spots or moles. Anything changing, itching or bleeding may be something to look out for—it’s better to be safe than sorry. 

Protect from the sun 


Where protective clothing to shade yourself from direct sunlight.  Photo by    Ksenia Makagonova    on    Unsplash

Where protective clothing to shade yourself from direct sunlight. Photo by Ksenia Makagonova on Unsplash

Don’t expose your skin to too much direct sun. Stay in the shade when you can, wear protective clothing and use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30. Apply sunscreen to any exposed surface, especially your face, even if it’s cloudy outside. 


Hollie Lao is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at hollianne.lao@uconn.edu.

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