Impeachment for the Democrats: Unlikely, unavoidable and self-destructive 

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Despite talks of impeachment since his election, there has not been something so egregious to mandate his removal.  Photo from the Associated Press.

Despite talks of impeachment since his election, there has not been something so egregious to mandate his removal. Photo from the Associated Press.

Impeachment has loomed over Donald Trump’s presidency ever since his election in 2016. Whether it was due to his comments concerning race, religion and gender or his alleged criminal dealings with Russia and Ukraine, citizens and politicians alike have actively spoken out in favor of impeaching President Trump for various reasons. Some reasons for wanting his impeachment are clear examples of how the president is not representative of the nation he leads, although not a crime warranting his removal from office. After all, no matter how despicable it is to imitate a disabled man at a campaign rally or to “grab [a woman] by the p****,” even Trump’s most offensive moments would not be legally sufficient to begin an impeachment inquiry.  

However, reaching out to Ukraine and other global allies to exchange increased military aid for an investigation into political opponents warrants an inquiry. The way the media has portrayed the impeachment inquiry paints the situation to be incredibly dangerous for Trump’s presidency and for the political careers of his staff, with the Democrats growing closer and closer to voting on impeachment in the House. Be that as it may, the unsettling fact of the matter is that people nationwide have somehow convinced themselves that impeachment will be voted through Congress and the American nightmare of having a misogynistic and bigoted businessman in the White House will end. However, I feel this attempt at a power grab will completely backfire on the Democrats.  


Nancy Pelosi has been hesitant to pursue impeaching Trump from the start for fear of starting a political war.  Photo from the Associated Press.

Nancy Pelosi has been hesitant to pursue impeaching Trump from the start for fear of starting a political war. Photo from the Associated Press.

Trump’s inquiry has not been as cut and dry as it appears. Nancy Pelosi and several other Democrats were extremely reluctant to pursue impeachment in the first place, realizing they would be in for a political war. Although the alleged offenses committed by the president can be potentially dangerous for him and his administration, they are being actively fought by the Republicans, prolonging the inquiry. Several members of Trump’s administration such as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Vice President Mike Pence and President Trump’s attorney Rudy Giuliani refused to provide documents to aid in the inquiry. In addition, several Republicans have protested openly against the inquiry and the testimonies related to it. For example, Representative Matt Gaetz led a dramatic five hour march in which a group of House Republicans stormed courtrooms in order to disrupt the SFIC testimonies in session, even at one point ordering pizza. 

The division in America over the Trump impeachment is overwhelmingly apparent in surveys recorded by the Washington Post, with 49% of citizens supporting impeachment. The political parties drew their line in the sand on the impeachment with 82% of Republicans opposing impeachment, and the same percentage of Democrats supporting impeachment. Now that all of the information and statistics are laid out, we must address what the title so boldly claims the Trump impeachment to be: Unlikely, unavoidable and self-destructive.  


Trump’s recent actions have made the idea of impeachment unavoidable for Democrats.  Photo from the Associated Press.

Trump’s recent actions have made the idea of impeachment unavoidable for Democrats. Photo from the Associated Press.

The Ukraine situation made the impeachment inquiry request unavoidable for Pelosi. This was the final nail in the coffin for President Trump in terms of alleged offenses, with this situation being the most damaging for him, and one that would likely prove the president to have committed a crime warranting impeachment. However, Pelosi was reluctant to go forward on the issue for a reason: The United States Senate. The Senate has been notoriously dangerous for whichever party is in the minority and with the Republicans having a majority and Mitch McConnell being at the helm, there is simply no way Trump gets impeached. Several Republican senators have given up fighting the impeachment inquiry, but 82% of Republicans are not backing impeachment. So when it comes down to it, if it does before the 2020 elections, I refuse to believe the Senate will vote President Trump out of office. Voting Trump out before the 2020 campaign is terrible for the Republicans, who would be forced to support Mike Pence for the duration of Trump’s term, and then scramble to find a new candidate for 2020. But as I stated before, I sincerely doubt such a thing will occur. Once the impeachment falls through, not only would the goal line stand in Congress be successful for the GOP, but then Trump is back in control. 

Trump’s command of Twitter as a manipulative tool is unprecedented, and once impeachment dies in Congress, he would officially be able to declare the inquiry an unsubstantiated “witchhunt” orchestrated by the Democrats in order to remove him from office. This would result in his ratings being boosted once more, and then he would be back to focusing on 2020, in which the Democrats have yet to agree on one candidate and one platform. All in all, I sincerely hope impeachment falls through , because if not, we are surely looking at another four years of Donald Trump.  

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed by individual writers in the opinion section do not reflect the views and opinions of The Daily Campus or other staff members. Only articles labeled “Editorial” are the official opinions of The Daily Campus.


Mason Holland is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at mason.holland@uconn.edu.

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