In Case You Missed It: What happened this week in national news

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California School Shooting  


Students are escorted out of Saugus High School after reports of a shooting on Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019, in Santa Clarita, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Students are escorted out of Saugus High School after reports of a shooting on Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019, in Santa Clarita, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

On Thursday morning, a 16-year-old student opened-fire at Saugus High School in Santa Clarita, California, killing two and injuring three others before shooting himself, according to the Los Angeles Times. It was the shooter’s 16th birthday, but his motive for the massacre is still unclear. One of the three injured victims was released from the hospital Thursday afternoon, while the other two are expected to recover. The shooter is listed as in grave condition at a local hospital.   

SDSU Fraternity Death 


People walk on campus at San Diego State University Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, in San Diego, Calif. San Diego State University says a freshman who was hospitalized after attending a fraternity party last week has died. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

People walk on campus at San Diego State University Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, in San Diego, Calif. San Diego State University says a freshman who was hospitalized after attending a fraternity party last week has died. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

The San Diego County Medical Examiner’s Office ruled a student at San Diego State University (SDSU) died in the early hours of Nov. 7 from blunt force injury to the head after he fell from his elevated bunk bed, according to People and the New York Post. The deceased, freshman Dylan Hernandez, reportedly had just returned from an off-campus fraternity party. SDSU’s president Adela de la Torre announced it would be temporarily suspending 14 of the university’s fraternities — all of which are associated with the Interfraternity Council. Phi Gamma Delta, the fraternity Hernandez was pledging at the time of his death, was placed on probation by the school, citing “violation of regulations pertaining to alcohol at off-campus events.”   

College Gymnast Death  


Twenty-year-old Melanie Coleman of Milford, Connecticut, was an All-State gymnast and captain of the gymnastics team during her years at Jonathan Law High School. Coleman died over the weekend following a spinal cord injury during a training exercise. (Photo Courtesy of Southern Connecticut State University)

Twenty-year-old Melanie Coleman of Milford, Connecticut, was an All-State gymnast and captain of the gymnastics team during her years at Jonathan Law High School. Coleman died over the weekend following a spinal cord injury during a training exercise. (Photo Courtesy of Southern Connecticut State University)

A gymnast at Southern Connecticut State University (SCSU) in New Haven died over the weekend after sustaining a spinal cord injury when she fell off the uneven bars during a training exercise last Friday, according to the Hartford Courant. Twenty-year-old Melanie Coleman of Milford, Connecticut, was an All-State gymnast and captain of the gymnastics team during her years at Jonathan Law High School. Coleman was a junior at SCSU studying nursing and hoped to follow in the footsteps of her two older sisters. SCSU has had a rental contract with New Era training facility since 2003, the gym where the accident occurred. A GoFundMe campaign set up last weekend has raised nearly $70,000 to support Coleman’s family.   

Public Impeachment Hearing 


President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the CenturyLink Center, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019, in Bossier City, La. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the CenturyLink Center, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019, in Bossier City, La. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

The House Intelligence Committee held its first public hearing in the impeachment probe against President Trump Wednesday, which included testimony from Bill Taylor, a top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, according to ABC News. Taylor testified a staffer told him about a call that occured between President Trump and the United States Ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland, on July 26, one day after Trump had urged the Ukranian president over the phone to look into Joe and Hunter Biden. Taylor testified when the staffer asked Sondland about Trump’s feelings toward Ukraine, Sondland reportedly said Trump “cares more about the investigations of Biden, which [Rudy] Giuliani was pressing for.” The staffer in question will deliver a private testimony today. Senator Lindsey Graham later said Wednesday he will not allow for Senate impeachment hearings to proceed until Congress hears from the whistleblower who brought the call in question to light. On Thursday morning, Trump tweeted, “@RepRatcliffe asked the two ‘star’ witnesses, ‘where is the impeachable event in that call?’ Both stared straight ahead with a blank look on their face, remained silent, & were unable to answer the question. That would be the end of a case run by normal people! – but not Shifty!” 

Supreme Court’s Sandy Hook Decision 


FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2015 file photo, the Supreme Court is seen in Washington. The Supreme Court is letting the lawsuit against the maker of the rifle used in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting go forward. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

FILE – In this Oct. 5, 2015 file photo, the Supreme Court is seen in Washington. The Supreme Court is letting the lawsuit against the maker of the rifle used in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting go forward. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

On Tuesday, the United States Supreme Court ruled not to block a lawsuit by families of the Sandy Hook shooting victims against Remington Arms Co., the company responsible for producing the rifle the gunman used to kill 20 children and six educators in the 2012 massacre, according to CNN Business. A 2005 federal statute prevents holding gun manufacturers accountable for wrongful death lawsuits, but the Sandy Hook families are more focused on Remington’s advertising strategy. Their attorneys are aiming to hold Remington Arms partially responsible for marketing the rifle in question as a militaristic, high-power combat weapon, which they argue would be in direct violation of a Connecticut statute prohibiting deceptive marketing practices.  


Taylor Harton is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. She can be reached by email at taylor.harton@uconn.edu.

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