Smart bandage can help wound treatment 

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University of Connecticut associate professor and the faculty member Dr. Ali Tamayol, of the biomedical engineering department, created a wirelessly-controlled bandage. This bandage is targeted for chronic wounds, and releases the medicine though miniature needles.  Photo courtesy of    UConn Today   , provided by Dr. Ali Tamayol.

University of Connecticut associate professor and the faculty member Dr. Ali Tamayol, of the biomedical engineering department, created a wirelessly-controlled bandage. This bandage is targeted for chronic wounds, and releases the medicine though miniature needles. Photo courtesy of UConn Today, provided by Dr. Ali Tamayol.

A University of Connecticut associate professor and the faculty of the biomedical engineering department created a wirelessly-controlled bandage, according to UConn Today.

The bandage, with its own platform, can “precisely deliver different medications to the wound with independent dosing,” according to UConn Today. Dr. Ali Tamayol, with the biomedical engineering department and researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Harvard Medical School, wanted to create a bandage that could help ensure proper treatment.  

“This is an important step in engineering advanced bandages that can facilitate the healing of hard to treat wounds. The bandage does not need to be changed continuously,” Tamayol said to UConn Today. 

This bandage is targeted for chronic wounds. Chronic wounds — wounds that do not heal on their own after three months — affect around 4.5 million Americans a year, according to the research article “A Wirelessly Controlled Smart Bandage with 3D‐Printed Miniaturized Needle Arrays.”  

The bandage releases the medicine though miniature needles, according to UConn Today. When it gets administered, it is controlled through a wireless controller from the medical provider.  

By using needles, it is able to deliver medicine deeper in the wound with minimal pain, which can be more effective, according to UConn Today. 

In the research article “A Wirelessly Controlled Smart Bandage with 3D‐Printed Miniaturized Needle Arrays,” it noted that different medicines are needed throughout wound healing and tissue regeneration. With this “smart” bandage, the ability to deliver different medicines during these stages can lead to improved healing.   

Tamayol recently applied for a patent for this technology, according to UConn Today. 

Thumbnail photo courtesy of @nci from Unsplash.com.


Rachel Philipson is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at rachel.philipson@uconn.edu

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