In Case You Missed It: What happened this week beyond UConn 

0
0
exc-5e5739a9fbd70e218a5284ba


In this Nov. 21, 2017 file photo, from left, Los Angeles Lakers legend Kobe Bryant, his daughter Gianna Maria-Onore Bryant, wife Vanessa and daughter Natalia Diamante Bryant are seen before a Connecticut-UCLA NCAA women's basketball game in Los Angeles. Kobe Bryant's widow on Monday, Feb. 24, 2020, sued the owner of the helicopter that crashed in fog and killed the former Los Angeles Lakers star and their 13-year-old daughter Gianna last month. The wrongful death lawsuit filed by Vanessa Bryant in Los Angeles Superior Court said the pilot was careless and negligent by flying in cloudy conditions Jan. 26 and should have aborted the flight.  Photo by Reed Saxon, File / AP Photo

In this Nov. 21, 2017 file photo, from left, Los Angeles Lakers legend Kobe Bryant, his daughter Gianna Maria-Onore Bryant, wife Vanessa and daughter Natalia Diamante Bryant are seen before a Connecticut-UCLA NCAA women’s basketball game in Los Angeles. Kobe Bryant’s widow on Monday, Feb. 24, 2020, sued the owner of the helicopter that crashed in fog and killed the former Los Angeles Lakers star and their 13-year-old daughter Gianna last month. The wrongful death lawsuit filed by Vanessa Bryant in Los Angeles Superior Court said the pilot was careless and negligent by flying in cloudy conditions Jan. 26 and should have aborted the flight. Photo by Reed Saxon, File / AP Photo

Kobe Bryant Wrongful Death Lawsuit 

Vanessa Bryant, the widow of Kobe Bryant and mother of Gianna Bryant, who were both killed in a helicopter accident in January, has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the helicopter company, Island Express Helicopters, Inc., according KTLA5. The lawsuit alleges that the pilot of the helicopter, Ara Zobayan, was negligent and careless and should have grounded the helicopter until the extremely foggy conditions cleared up. The lawsuit also states that Zobayan failed to properly assess the weather and failed to control the helicopter. It also alleges the operating company was negligent in not installing a terrain awareness mechanism on the helicopter that could have potentially prevented the crash. The lawsuit was filed in Los Angeles Superior Court on the same day as Kobe and Gianna’s public memorial service at the Staples Center, where the Lakers play.  

 

Florida Abortion Bill 

On Friday, the Florida legislature passed a bill that requires women under 18 years old to be granted parental permission before receiving an abortion, according to NBC News. The House voted 75-43 along party lines in favor of the bill, and Governor Ron DeSantis is expected to sign it in the coming days. The bill includes a provision that would allow girls to receive a waiver from the permission guidelines in the event of abuse, incest or a situation where notifying a parent would be more harmful than going forward with the procedure. “We require parental consent for a minor to get a driving learner’s permit because it is common sense. It is not common sense to suggest that getting a learner’s permit is a less significant life decision than a child getting an abortion,” Rep. Ana Maria Rodriguez said. “A parent guiding their children through major life decisions is a good thing.” 

 

Coronavirus Precautions 


Passengers wears face masks as a precaution against the COVID-19 while sitting in a bus in Hong Kong, Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020. Photo by Kin Cheung / AP Photo

Passengers wears face masks as a precaution against the COVID-19 while sitting in a bus in Hong Kong, Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020. Photo by Kin Cheung / AP Photo

Several universities in the state of Connecticut are electing to bring students studying abroad home and suspending abroad classes amid growing fears about COVID-19, the deadly strain of coronavirus that originated last year in Wuhan, China, according to WTNH. Fairfield University is currently pulling students out of an abroad program in Italy after confirmed cases were reported there. Florence University of the Arts in Italy is also closing its doors to abroad students and sending several home indefinitely. The University of New Haven is also temporarily suspending classes in Tuscany, Italy, and encouraging all 80 students studying there to come back to Connecticut. University officials said those that are coming back must self-quarantine for two weeks in order to ensure safety and prevent the possible transmission of the virus. Quinnipiac, Southern Connecticut State University and Yale University have yet to make any definite calls on the decisions for students abroad.  

 

Harvey Weinstein Convicted 

Former popular film producer Harvey Weinstein was found guilty Monday of third-degree rape and first-degree committing a criminal sexual act nearly two years after allegations against him started the #MeToo movement, according to CNBC. He was acquitted of a majority of charges including first-degree rape and two counts of predatory sexual assault which could have cost him a life sentence. The jury, comprised of seven men and five women, deliberated for 27 hours over a five-day period about the charges. After the trial, Weinstein was handcuffed and ordered to be held without bail until his March 11 sentencing. He faces five to 25 years in prison. 


In this Feb. 14, 2018 file photo, Lamonte McIntyre, convicted of a 1994 double homicide in Kansas City, Kan., sits before the Senate Judiciary Committee in Topika Kan. McIntyre, who spent 23 years in prison for a double murder he did not commit was granted more than $1.5 million in compensation under the state's mistaken-conviction statute. The Kansas attorney general's office said Monday, Feb. 24, 2020, that McIntyre of Kansas City, Kan., also received a certificate of innocence as part of a resolution of a mistaken-conviction lawsuit filed last year. Photo by Thad Allton / The Topeka Capital-Journal via AP.

In this Feb. 14, 2018 file photo, Lamonte McIntyre, convicted of a 1994 double homicide in Kansas City, Kan., sits before the Senate Judiciary Committee in Topika Kan. McIntyre, who spent 23 years in prison for a double murder he did not commit was granted more than $1.5 million in compensation under the state’s mistaken-conviction statute. The Kansas attorney general’s office said Monday, Feb. 24, 2020, that McIntyre of Kansas City, Kan., also received a certificate of innocence as part of a resolution of a mistaken-conviction lawsuit filed last year. Photo by Thad Allton / The Topeka Capital-Journal via AP.

 

Kansas Wrongful Arrest Case 

Lamonte McIntyre, a man who has now spent over 20 years in prison for a double murder he did not commit, will receive $1.5 million as compensation for the erroneous conviction, according to Time Magazine. In 1994, McIntyre was tried and convicted for the murders of Donald Ewing and Doniel Quinn, who were fatally shot while sitting in their vehicle in broad daylight. There was no physical evidence to convict McIntyre or a known motive, but it was later discovered that the prosecutor had intimidated witnesses into saying the description of the killer and McIntyre matched up. It was also discovered the judge in the case and the prosecutor were having a romantic relationship at the time of the case. McIntyre was released from prison after 23 years in 2017.  


Taylor Harton is the associate news editor for The Daily Campus. She can be reached by email at taylor.harton@uconn.edu.

Leave a Reply