Full-Time Online: Students share their thoughts and experiences with online coursework

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In early March, UConn made the announcement they were moving classes online for the remainder of the semester. With this has come several challenges for both students and professors to get acclimated with the new system.  Photo by Eric Wang/The Daily Campus.

In early March, UConn made the announcement they were moving classes online for the remainder of the semester. With this has come several challenges for both students and professors to get acclimated with the new system. Photo by Eric Wang/The Daily Campus.

Students at the University of Connecticut said they are facing challenges and different schedules after the university moved all classes online due to COVID-19. 

Maggie Major, a second-semester biology major, said she found her classes have gotten harder and she has been doing more work.

“Rather than class discussions for gen-eds, I now have worksheets to complete which takes a lot of time,” she said. 

Major said her professors have been using Kaltura to upload videos and lectures. 

“Also, some of my classes have changed their routine of when things are due, so that’s tough since most of my class assignments are all basically due on Friday nights now,” Major said.

Brook Shaferi, a sixth-semester agriculture and natural health resources major, wrote over Facebook messenger that the transition to online classes has been difficult. 

“This transition to online classes has been extremely difficult because classes that I have that are predominantly on the farm or in the lab be[ing] online is an impossible transition,” she wrote.

Shaferi said her professors have been using HuskyCT and supplemental videos to conduct classes.

“In one of my classes, for example, we are shearing sheep and I simply can not shear a sheep over the computer or through a video,” she said. “I can watch people shear, but watching does not translate to doing something.”

Sixth-semester biology major Joana Shurdho wrote in a Facebook message that classes are going well, but it is hard to adjust.  

“Overall, it really takes out the most important and interesting aspect of learning in lab,” she said. “I know this is the best that can be done given the circumstances, but we’re losing a lot of valuable experience with these courses being converted to online.”

Shurdho said that, for one lab, the class will watch a demonstration of the lab and draw conclusions based on provided data. Another class will not have the expected ending to a semester-long experiment.

“In one of my other classes, we had a semester-long experiment where we complete a manuscript at the end, but since we’re not able to finish the lab, the professor has to give us ‘predicted’ results and we write our manuscript based on that,” Shurdho said.

Students with questions or concerns about their online classes can visit the “Frequently Asked Questions” page at onlinestudent.uconn.edu or email ecampus@uconn.edu.

Related Content:

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Dining Beat: Students adjust to new dining regulations amid pandemic


Olivia Hickey is a campus correspondent for The Daily Campus. She can be reached via email at olivia.hickey@uconn.edu. She tweets @oliviahickeytv.

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