University Senate shortens grade appeal process, discusses budget

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UConn Senate voted favor of shortening the student grade appeal process to 10 days. Students are required to notify administration of their grade appeal within 10 days of being given the grade.  Photo by Kevin Lindstorm/The Daily Campus

UConn Senate voted favor of shortening the student grade appeal process to 10 days. Students are required to notify administration of their grade appeal within 10 days of being given the grade. Photo by Kevin Lindstorm/The Daily Campus

The University of Connecticut University Senate voted in favor of shortening the student grade appeal process from six months to 10 days through an amendment of its bylaws Monday. 

The amendment requires that students notify the administration of their grade appeal request within 10 days of being given the grade. This is so the appeal process will be shortened from a potential 250-day process down to 64 days from start to finish.  

Its passing came with some hesitation from the student senators, namely Senator Damani Douglas, who was adamant in his distaste for it. 

“When I first saw it, I was kind of disheartened,” Douglas said. “Dropping from six months to 10 days is drastic and I do think that so long as students who do not get regular updates on what their grades are, because professors aren’t doing their parts, is extremely unfair to cut the only window that students to have for any kind of recourse so drastically.” 

The intention of the policy is to expedite the process so students who received an incorrect grade are not affected when it comes to academic standing, financial aid, graduation or potential job prospects, according to Senator Maureen Armstrong’s statement during Monday’s meeting. 

University Senate voted nearly unanimously to adopt this decision, with one abstention. 

UConn’s CFO and Executive Vice President for Administration Scott Jordan presented the yearly budget to the senate as well as future year’s projections, which gave rise to many questions. Specifically, senators raised concerns about the deficit created by athletics, the university’s endowment fund and fringe benefit costs, which are auxiliary benefits given to workers outside of their salaries. 

“Here is a frustration that’s shared,” Jordan said about UConn’s football program and their impact on the deficit athletics created. “It’s a frustration that says ‘jeez, things used to be better and now they’re worse, and we’re frustrated about that.’ President Herbst’s administration, Katsouleas’ administration, the trustees over several chairs, the foundation and, since I’ve been here, two athletics directors have been very focused on solving this problem.”   

While unofficial at this point, Jordan said President Thomas Katsouleas and UConn Foundation President and CEO Scott Roberts were looking into increases in the number of development officers. These positions, who work as fundraisers essentially, have shown to have a 10 to one return rate at other universities, according to Jordan. 


Mike Mavredakis is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at michael.quinn-mavredakis@uconn.edu. He tweets @mmavredakis.

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