In Case You Missed It: What (good) happened this week beyond UConn

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For the next few weeks, “In Case You Missed It” will solely be focusing on good things that have happened outside of UConn in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Because of the influx of news from the mainstream media, I decided it was best to reframe this column in a way that allows it to be a positive place for people to go to and remember when they need a pick-me-up. As always, stay healthy and stay safe. 


A customer left a large tip after ordering takeout from a steakhouse in Arkansas last week.  Photo by    Sam Dan Truong    on    Unsplash   . Thumbnail photo courtesy of    Iñaki del Olmo    on    Unsplash   .

A customer left a large tip after ordering takeout from a steakhouse in Arkansas last week. Photo by Sam Dan Truong on Unsplash. Thumbnail photo courtesy of Iñaki del Olmo on Unsplash.

Generous Tip

A regular customer ordering takeout from a Pine Bluff, Arkansas steakhouse left a hefty tip for the restaurant last week, according to Good News Network. The customer’s tip totaled $1,200, the entirety of the government stimulus check sent out to individuals to alleviate the financial burden of the pandemic shutdown. The manager of Colonial Steakhouse, Allison Hall, told KARK News, “We just started crying and thanking God because it came at a time that most of our staff really needed it. Things have been barely getting by, but we are making it, though.” The steakhouse is reportedly still in a good place to reopen when lockdown restrictions are lifted in the coming months. The customer has not been publicly identified. 

Little Free Libraries

The book exchange boxes which have appeared on several front yards and street corners in the past couple of months have been repurposed to store essential items for people to pick up during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to MSN. Little Free Libraries, the movement behind the boxes, devised a new map around the country in recent weeks to help get supplies like toilet paper, staple foods and other necessary needs to people who need them the most. The new map allows viewers to see the address, city and state of the box as well as what is being offered at that specific location. Little Free Libraries are in every state and 108 other countries. “There was already this infrastructure of people who were already sharing and looking out for each other in their communities,” said Margret Aldrich, head of programming and media for the Hudson, Wisconsin base of Little Free Libraries. “So it was very easy to transform them into boxes sharing more than books.” 


Chik-fil-A is only one of many big-name donors who have contributed to help serve 300,000 meals through the Los Angeles Dream Center.  Photo by    Brad Stallcup    on    Unsplash   .

Chik-fil-A is only one of many big-name donors who have contributed to help serve 300,000 meals through the Los Angeles Dream Center. Photo by Brad Stallcup on Unsplash.

Los Angeles Dream Center

Rapper Kanye West and Chick-fil-A are just a few of the donors who have come together to help serve 300,000 meals through the Los Angeles Dream Center since mid-March, according to Fox News. The center provides over 11,000 meals a day to families in the second-largest school district in the United States. The center is open seven days a week from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and offers food as well as other essential items to those who need them. Other companies like Anthem Blue Cross have been providing hundreds of bottles of hand sanitizer for the drive. “The Los Angeles Dream Center has transformed into the Grand Central Station of food distribution and other basic essentials. I’m so grateful that our team has stayed healthy, and that we’ve found a safe way to meet the urgent needs within our community. I can’t say thank you enough to the various donors who’ve made this a reality,” said Matthew Barnett, Dream Center co-founder. “This is what a neighborhood, a community and a church should always look like.”

Baby Reunion 

A mother in New York City who was forced to undergo an emergency Caesarean section after being diagnosed with COVID-19 finally had the chance to meet her baby 25 days after the birth, according to ABC News. Iris Nolasco, who is originally from Honduras, tested positive for the virus but came back to the hospital after she found herself struggling to breathe, where doctors later decided to try to deliver her baby. Her baby, Isabella Michelle, was born on March 27 and spent several weeks without her mother in the neonatal intensive care unit while she recovered from the virus. Finally, on April 21, Nolasco finally got to meet her baby girl face to face. “You don’t feel like it’s gonna touch you. You never think that it’s gonna happen to you. It’s hard going through,” Nolasco said on Tuesday. “But now this is victory. This is a miracle. Think God’s time is perfect. There’s always a reason for things to happen. It’s hard to accept it but that’s how it is.”


Teresa Provo of Chicago has been making personalized masks to mail to family and friends.  Photo by    🇨🇭 Claudio Schwarz | @purzlbaum    on    Unsplash   .

Teresa Provo of Chicago has been making personalized masks to mail to family and friends. Photo by 🇨🇭 Claudio Schwarz | @purzlbaum on Unsplash.

Mask Making

An 89-year-old grandmother who lives alone in Chicago, Illinois has helped make over 600 masks to mail to family and friends all over the country, according to Good News Network. Teresa Provo made sure each mask she sewed was personalized with a different fabric and note for encouragement for each person receiving one. A group of other elders at Teresa’s nursing home have also joined forces to help her in her efforts to make more masks.

Related Content:

In Case You Missed It: What (good) happened this week beyond UConn

Feel Good Friday: UConn takes part in inaugural National Collegiate Recovery Day


Taylor Harton is the associate news editor for The Daily Campus. She can be reached by email at taylor.harton@uconn.edu.

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