UConn ITS offers students free access to Adobe Creative Cloud

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As of March, the Adobe Creative Cloud is available for free to students through their schools, including the University of Connecticut, according to Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer Michael Mundrane.  Photo courtesy of Pexels

As of March, the Adobe Creative Cloud is available for free to students through their schools, including the University of Connecticut, according to Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer Michael Mundrane. Photo courtesy of Pexels

The University of Connecticut’s Information Technology Services (UITS) is offering students a free and temporary license to the Adobe Creative Cloud.

“Adobe has been reaching out broadly to offer, at no cost, temporary Adobe Creative Cloud user licenses to universities and other educational institutions that have already purchased ‘Shared Device Licenses for Education,’” Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer Michael Mundrane said. “ITS uses this licensing to install Adobe Creative Cloud on university library lab computers and this qualified UConn for the new program.”

The Creative Cloud includes many applications for graphic design, photo and video editing including Photoshop, InDesign and Premiere Pro. The license is free for new Adobe users until May 31, 2020. Students must apply for this license through their UConn email at software.uconn.edu

According to Mundrane, ITS validates a student’s email address and sends it to Adobe, who then manages the registration and product fulfillment. There are also many other education institutions who are participating in the program, which has caused some delays. 

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It can be scary at first but, as someone who’s been working in the creative content world for a few years now, I can say without a doubt that it’s something worth diving into.
— Nicholas Hampton

Adobe usually resolves any issues within 24 hours, but students can also troubleshoot by visiting the Adobe FAQ for help, Mundrane said.

“Adobe made this move to free access in the first couple weeks of March,” Global Affairs Multimedia Project Specialist and UConn alumnus Nicholas Hampton said. “It just goes to show you how much Adobe is truly trying to support their creative community and in this instance, everyone beyond it as well.”

Hampton, whose job relies heavily on the daily use of Adobe products, said that it’s important for students to have access to Adobe’s products because it helps foster creativity and improve upon skill sets.

“There’s Adobe programs for graphic design, video, photo, audio, animation, you name it. But it’s really one of those things where if you don’t have the tools to get it done or even just experiment and learn, then you flat out can’t do it,” Hampton said. 

Hampton mentioned that even though Adobe products are professional programs and first-time users may have some trouble learning them, there are plenty of online tutorials from Adobe and other content creators.

“It can be scary at first but, as someone who’s been working in the creative content world for a few years now, I can say without a doubt that it’s something worth diving into,” Hampton said.


Brandon Barzola is a staff writer for The Daily Campus. He can be reached via email at brandon.barzola@uconn.edu

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